April 12, 2014
rouxfully:

seraphknights:

cultureshift:

This is the Memorial to the Missing and contains over 50,000,000 pennies to represent the lives of each American child abandoned to abortion by a society and a culture that has embraced their destruction. We must prevent the need to add to this memorial. Take a stand. Get involved.
 ”How we treat the least of us defines us.”

"should I use this $500k to help struggling parents and pregnant people or should I put it in a glass box"

^ ^ ^ yuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuup

$500k is a hell of a lot of food and Head Start.

rouxfully:

seraphknights:

cultureshift:

This is the Memorial to the Missing and contains over 50,000,000 pennies to represent the lives of each American child abandoned to abortion by a society and a culture that has embraced their destruction. We must prevent the need to add to this memorial. Take a stand. Get involved.

 ”How we treat the least of us defines us.”

"should I use this $500k to help struggling parents and pregnant people or should I put it in a glass box"

^ ^ ^ yuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuup

$500k is a hell of a lot of food and Head Start.

(via glitterchance)

March 31, 2014
"I am so ready to let go of the America’s Next Top Radical model of social justice; it’s unsustainable, unproductive, and frankly a pretty bad strategy. It seems as though some of us – us being folks invested in the advancement of social justice in some way or another – are calling folks out sometimes not to educate a person who’s wrong, but to position themselves a rung above on the radical ladder. What’s worse, both in real-world organizing and online, this behavior is often rewarded: with pats on the back, social status, followers. We’re waiting and ready to cut folks out when they say the wrong thing. We’ve created an activist culture in which the worst thing we can do is to make a mistake."

Verónica Flores (via andreagoldston)

(Source: viajerra, via onthehill)

March 8, 2014
lifehackprofessional:

wasdplz:

drtanner-sfw:

newvagabond:

HEY IMPORTANT THING. I just got this email: 

BIG NEWS: President Obama just announced that he is taking major action against sexual assault by creating a presidential task force to fight rape on college campuses.1
Having the President on our side is huge at a moment when sexual assault on college campuses has reached an epidemic level. Right now, 1 in 5 women will be assaulted or raped during college.2
For over a year now, the UltraViolet community—that’s you!—has been taking action together to tackle rape culture and stand up for survivors. Together with our allies, we’ve helped bring the epidemic of sexual assault on college campuses into the spotlight and called on the Administration to address it.
That’s why the White House wants to know what solutions YOU want to see. As an advocate who has spoken out for survivors before, your input is valuable. This is a major opportunity to be heard by the President and White House.
Can you take 3 minutes to fill out a short, easy survey about what you think the Presidential Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault should do? We’ll deliver your response to the White House next week.
Presidential commissions have a mixed record—some have faded into historical footnotes, while others have changed the course of our country’s history. For example, President Reagan’s HIV/AIDS task force led to increased funding for drug trials and an end to federal discrimination against those who are HIV-positive.3
We know that searches for solutions to sexual assault and rape can end up victim-blaming instead of holding attackers accountable. It’s why we’re bombarded by media figures that blame alcohol, twerking, and teenage naivete for rape instead of the rapists.4 And just last year, campus after campus—from Yale to USC—was called out for mishandling rape cases.5
When colleges don’t take rape accusations seriously, it discourages survivors from reporting. Only 12% of survivors report the assault, and it’s more often the survivors rather than their attackers who drop out of school.6
A federal task force will create uniform guidelines that colleges should follow to stop sexual assault and punish rapists. Data and research is helpful, but input from citizens who care and know about the problem is critical to finding the right solutions.
Last year, Ultraviolet members spoke out and demanded the Department of Education start holding campuses accountable for failing to uphold Title IX—the federal law that bans sexual discrimination in education, including sexual assault. From Steubenville, Ohio, and Maryville, Missouri, to Yale University, you’ve spoken out time and again to demand justice for survivors who have been swept aside by school authorities, law enforcement, and their communities. Now the President himself is demanding more be done, and he wants to hear from you.
Take 3 minutes to let the White House know what you want the student sexual assault task force to work on.
Thanks for speaking out.
—Nita, Shaunna, Kat, Karin, Malinda, Adam, and Gabriela, the UltraViolet team

This is super big! 
Share any stories, even from friends or even if you haven’t actually been assaulted. Like I was actually stalked by and sent very vulgar and graphic messages from a male classmate more than twice my age when I was in college, and the school did nothing to protect me other than tell the man to stop talking to me, and it was the third time he’d done that to female classmates. I literally had to have someone chaperone me to and from my car because I was so scared of this guy.

HOLY SHIT, SOMETHING GOOD HAPPENING IN AMERICA!?
SIGNAL BOOST THE SHIT OUT OF THIS.

Please do this. It’s super quick.
(fixed the link, because it was one that was signed in under someone else’s name)

Important enough that I want reblog on here. 

lifehackprofessional:

wasdplz:

drtanner-sfw:

newvagabond:

HEY IMPORTANT THING. I just got this email: 

BIG NEWS: President Obama just announced that he is taking major action against sexual assault by creating a presidential task force to fight rape on college campuses.1

Having the President on our side is huge at a moment when sexual assault on college campuses has reached an epidemic level. Right now, 1 in 5 women will be assaulted or raped during college.2

For over a year now, the UltraViolet community—that’s you!—has been taking action together to tackle rape culture and stand up for survivors. Together with our allies, we’ve helped bring the epidemic of sexual assault on college campuses into the spotlight and called on the Administration to address it.

That’s why the White House wants to know what solutions YOU want to see. As an advocate who has spoken out for survivors before, your input is valuable. This is a major opportunity to be heard by the President and White House.

Can you take 3 minutes to fill out a short, easy survey about what you think the Presidential Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault should do? We’ll deliver your response to the White House next week.

Presidential commissions have a mixed record—some have faded into historical footnotes, while others have changed the course of our country’s history. For example, President Reagan’s HIV/AIDS task force led to increased funding for drug trials and an end to federal discrimination against those who are HIV-positive.3

We know that searches for solutions to sexual assault and rape can end up victim-blaming instead of holding attackers accountable. It’s why we’re bombarded by media figures that blame alcohol, twerking, and teenage naivete for rape instead of the rapists.4 And just last year, campus after campus—from Yale to USC—was called out for mishandling rape cases.5

When colleges don’t take rape accusations seriously, it discourages survivors from reporting. Only 12% of survivors report the assault, and it’s more often the survivors rather than their attackers who drop out of school.6

A federal task force will create uniform guidelines that colleges should follow to stop sexual assault and punish rapists. Data and research is helpful, but input from citizens who care and know about the problem is critical to finding the right solutions.

Last year, Ultraviolet members spoke out and demanded the Department of Education start holding campuses accountable for failing to uphold Title IX—the federal law that bans sexual discrimination in education, including sexual assault. From Steubenville, Ohio, and Maryville, Missouri, to Yale University, you’ve spoken out time and again to demand justice for survivors who have been swept aside by school authorities, law enforcement, and their communities. Now the President himself is demanding more be done, and he wants to hear from you.

Take 3 minutes to let the White House know what you want the student sexual assault task force to work on.

Thanks for speaking out.

—Nita, Shaunna, Kat, Karin, Malinda, Adam, and Gabriela, the UltraViolet team

This is super big! 

Share any stories, even from friends or even if you haven’t actually been assaulted. Like I was actually stalked by and sent very vulgar and graphic messages from a male classmate more than twice my age when I was in college, and the school did nothing to protect me other than tell the man to stop talking to me, and it was the third time he’d done that to female classmates. I literally had to have someone chaperone me to and from my car because I was so scared of this guy.

HOLY SHIT, SOMETHING GOOD HAPPENING IN AMERICA!?

SIGNAL BOOST THE SHIT OUT OF THIS.

Please do this. It’s super quick.

(fixed the link, because it was one that was signed in under someone else’s name)

Important enough that I want reblog on here. 

(via apfelgranate)

March 2, 2014
tkohl:

American anti-capitalist poster, 1938.

tkohl:

American anti-capitalist poster, 1938.

(via monluztrella)

February 24, 2014

harrysbankaccount:

you don’t even need to make fun of republicans they do it for you

Apparently Republicans think that sex and the Antichrist are the same thing, which is actually not that much of a surprise.

(Source: harrymorphingintozayn, via ninety6tears)

February 13, 2014
diegueno:

This week, Tunisia passed a truly historic constitution widely heralded as a progressive and monumental document. Here’s just some of what these brave elected representatives agreed upon in the face of strong pressure from the more extreme factions of their parties:
Guaranteed equality between men and women
A constitutional mandate for environmental protection, only the third country in the world to do so
A declaration that health care is a human right, with preventative care and treatment for every citizen
A democracy with civil laws that respects freedom of religion
An established right to due process and protection from torture
In one stroke,
Tunisia’s become more democratic than many Western countries have been for years.This is a revolution of democracy and a great victory for human rights — and the more we recognize that, the more Tunisia can shine as an example for the Western and the Arab world!Congratulate the Legislators!MESSAGE FOR TUNISIAN LEGISLATORS: We , the citizens of the world, applaud your bravery in making a strong commitment to universal human values in your constitution. People deprived of democracy around the world look to you to set the example of human rights and democratic principle — hold true to the promises made in this revolutionary document! (via Three Cheers for Tunisia’s Revolutionary Constitution!)

diegueno:

This week, Tunisia passed a truly historic constitution widely heralded as a progressive and monumental document. 

Here’s just some of what these brave elected representatives agreed upon in the face of strong pressure from the more extreme factions of their parties:

  • Guaranteed equality between men and women
  • A constitutional mandate for environmental protection, only the third country in the world to do so
  • A declaration that health care is a human right, with preventative care and treatment for every citizen
  • A democracy with civil laws that respects freedom of religion
  • An established right to due process and protection from torture
In one stroke,
Tunisia’s become more democratic than many Western countries have been for years.

This is a revolution of democracy and a great victory for human rights — and the more we recognize that, the more Tunisia can shine as an example for the Western and the Arab world!

Congratulate the Legislators!

MESSAGE FOR TUNISIAN LEGISLATORS: We , the citizens of the world, applaud your bravery in making a strong commitment to universal human values in your constitution. People deprived of democracy around the world look to you to set the example of human rights and democratic principle — hold true to the promises made in this revolutionary document!

(via realmenwearpuppypants)

February 5, 2014
workingamerica:

LIKE if you support our postal worker brothers and sisters in the APWU - The American Postal Workers Union!
We’re standing up to reckless privatization across the country. Add your name now: http://wefb.it/xExMx5 http://ift.tt/1b80bww

workingamerica:

LIKE if you support our postal worker brothers and sisters in the APWU - The American Postal Workers Union!

We’re standing up to reckless privatization across the country. Add your name now: http://wefb.it/xExMx5 http://ift.tt/1b80bww

(via honeyandwormwood)

January 30, 2014

danfreakindavis:

obama is fucking done with all this bullshit in that last gif

(Source: beybad, via bathsweaver)

January 18, 2014

queennubian:

prochoiceamerica:

Today, the U.S. Supreme Court is hearing a challenge to a buffer zone law that protects patients and staff at clinics in Massachusetts from anti-choice harassment and violence.

Across the country, extreme, often violent, anti-choice protesters physically block access to clinics and intimidate people exercising their constitutionally protected rights.  Learn more about this issue and the laws that exist to protect patients and their doctors.

what judgement of abortion does

(via glitterchance)

January 18, 2014

bebinn:

After reading an NPR segment featuring a cheery grandmother as the face of anti-abortion protestors, clinic escort Erin Matson decided to show the truth behind the innocent facade. Click through for more first-person accounts of anti-choice harassment and terrorism.

Also: Protesters harassing a terminally ill woman. Videotaping patients coming and going. Slinging insults about appearance and body type. Shouting with bullhorns and microphones, both at passersby and into clinic windows. Then there’s just the mundane stuff like distributing creepy plastic fetuses, calling people Nazis, and providing inaccurate pseudomedical information. (I was a clinic escort for several years. The only reason I’m not now is because I live in a state with a buffer zone.)

(via monanotlisa)

January 8, 2014

In 1968, during the administration of US President Lyndon B. Johnson, Eartha Kitt encountered a substantial professional setback after she made anti-war statements during a White House luncheon. Kitt was invited to the White House luncheon and was asked by Lady Bird Johnson about the Vietnam War. She replied: “You send the best of this country off to be shot and maimed. No wonder the kids rebel and take pot.”

During a question and answer session, Kitt stated:

The children of America are not rebelling for no reason. They are not hippies for no reason at all. We don’t have what we have on Sunset Blvd. for no reason. They are rebelling against something. There are so many things burning the people of this country, particularly mothers. They feel they are going to raise sons — and I know what it’s like, and you have children of your own, Mrs. Johnson — we raise children and send them to war.

Her remarks reportedly caused Mrs. Johnson to burst into tears and led to a derailment in Kitt’s career

(Source: solomonorsalamander, via destronomics)

December 24, 2013

angryonabus:

fishingboatproceeds:

to-witness-my-fitness:

sandandglass:

Diane Ravitch on The Daily Show. 

Ravitch is the queen. If only the government would listen…

We would also address poverty directly. We would increase the minimum wage and make post-secondary education cheap or free, and we’d improve improve unemployment benefits and offer free job-training to the unemployed. 

Poverty is one of the few social ills where throwing money at the problem really does seem to work.

These are not radical, liberal ideas. In fact, in Europe most of them are associated with the more conservative parties, and many of them were associated with the American Republican party in the 80s. But the United States’s political climate is so different from anywhere else in the industrialized world that I fear we will just continue to get farther behind in education (and in % of people living in poverty) until we decide to make some big domestic investments.

Diane Ravitch is also fascinating, to me, because she was initially for NCLB, and has been fairly outspoken about having changed her views.  It takes guts to stand up and say, “no, I was wrong about this,” and I appreciate that about her.

PREACH.

(via bathsweaver)

December 17, 2013

meretricula:

life motto tbh

(Source: lemonclanarchive)

December 2, 2013
Because this speech is one of the most important things I know, and it should always be kept relevant.

handgrenade2:

Vito Russo’s “Why We Fight” Speech, delivered at an ACT UP rally in May 1988.

A friend of mine in New York City has a half-fare transit card, which means that you get on buses and subways for half price. And the other day, when he showed his card to the token attendant, the attendant asked what his disability was, and he said, “I have AIDS.” And the attendant said, “No, you don’t. If you had AIDS, you’d be home dying.” And so, I wanted to speak out today as a person with AIDS who is not dying. 

You know, for the last three years, since I was diagnosed, my family thinks two things about my situation: 1) they think I’m going to die, and 2) they think that my government is doing absolutely everything in their power to stop that. And they’re wrong, on both counts. 

So, if I’m dying from anything, I’m dying from homophobia. If I’m dying from anything, I’m dying from racism. If I’m dying from anything, it’s from indifference and red tape, because these are the things that are preventing an end to this crisis. If I’m dying from anything, I’m dying from Jesse Helms. If I’m dying from anything, I’m dying from the president of the United States. And, especially, if I’m dying from anything, I’m dying from the sensationalism of newspapers and magazines and television shows, which are interested in me, as a human-interest story, only as long as I’m willing to be a helpless victim, but not if I’m fighting for my life. If I’m dying from anything, I’m dying from the fact that not enough rich, white, heterosexual men have gotten AIDS for anybody to give a shit. 

You know, living with AIDS in this country is like living in the twilight zone. Living with AIDS is like living through a war, which is happening only for those people who happen to be in the trenches. Every time a shell explodes, you look around and you discover that you’ve lost more of your friends, but nobody else notices. It isn’t happening to them. They’re walking the streets as though we weren’t living through some sort of nightmare. And only you can hear the screams of the people who are dying and their cries for help. No one else seems to be noticing. 

And it’s worse than a war, because during a war people are united in a shared experience. This war has not united us; it’s divided us. It’s separated those of us with AIDS and those of us who fight for people with AIDS from the rest of the population. Two and a half years ago I picked up Life magazine, and I read an editorial which said, “It’s time to pay attention, because this disease is now beginning to strike the rest of us.” It was as if I wasn’t the one holding the magazine in my hand. And since then, nothing has changed to alter the perception that AIDS is not happening to the real people in this country. It’s not happening to “us” in the United States; it’s happening to “them,” to the disposable populations of fags and junkies who deserve what they get. The media tells them that they don’t have to care, because the people who really matter are not in danger. Twice, three times, four times, The New York Times has published editorials saying, Don’t panic yet over AIDS. It still hasn’t entered the general population, and until it does, we don’t have to give a shit

And the days, and the months, and the years pass by, and they don’t spend those days and nights and months and years trying to figure out how to get hold of the latest experimental drug, and which dose to take it at, and in what combination with other drugs, and from what source, and how are you going to pay for it, and where are you going to get it, because it isn’t happening to them, so they don’t give a shit. And they don’t sit in television studios, surrounded by technicians who are wearing rubber gloves, who won’t put a microphone on you, because it isn’t happening to them, so they don’t give a shit. And they don’t have their houses burned down by bigots and morons. They watch it on the news and they have dinner and they go to bed, because it isn’t happening to them, and they don’t give a shit. And they don’t spend their waking hours going from hospital room to hospital room, and watching the people that they love die slowly of neglect and bigotry, because it isn’t happening to them, and they don’t have to give a shit. They haven’t been to two funerals a week for the last three or four or five years, so they don’t give a shit, because it’s not happening to them. 

And we read on the front page of The New York Times last Saturday that Anthony Fauci now says that all sorts of promising drugs for treatment haven’t even been tested in the last two years because he can’t afford to hire the people to test them. We’re supposed to be grateful that this story has appeared in the newspaper after two years. Nobody wonders why some reporter didn’t dig up that story and print it 18 months ago, before Fauci got dragged before a congressional hearing. How many people are dead in the last two years who might be alive today if those drugs had been tested more quickly? Reporters all over the country are busy printing government press releases. They don’t give a shit; it isn’t happening to them, meaning that it isn’t happening to people like them: the real people, the world-famous general public we all keep hearing about. Legionnaires’ disease was happening to them because it hit people who looked like them, who sounded like them, who were the same color as them. And that fucking story about a couple of dozen people hit the front page of every newspaper and magazine in this country, and it stayed there until that mystery got solved. 

All I read in the newspapers tells me that the mainstream, white, heterosexual population is not at risk for this disease. All the newspapers I read tell me that IV-drug users and homosexuals still account for the overwhelming majority of cases and a majority of those people at risk. And can somebody please tell me why every single penny allocated for education and prevention gets spent on ad campaigns that are directed almost exclusively to white, heterosexual teenagers, who they keep telling us are not at risk? Can somebody tell me why the only television movie ever produced by a major network in this country about the impact of this disease is not about the impact of this disease on the man who has AIDS but of the impact of AIDS on his white, straight, nuclear family? Why, for eight years, every newspaper and magazine in this country has done cover stories on AIDS only when the threat of heterosexual transmission is raised? Why, for eight years, every single educational film designed for use in high schools has eliminated any gay-positive material before being approved by the Board of Education? Why, for eight years, every single public-information pamphlet and videotape distributed by establishment sources has ignored specific homosexual content? 

Why is every bus and subway ad I read and every advertisement and every billboard I see in this country specifically not directed at gay men? Don’t believe the lie that the gay community has done its job and done it well and educated its people. The gay community and IV-drug users are not all politicized people living in New York and San Francisco. Members of minority populations, including so-called sophisticated gay men, are abysmally ignorant about AIDS. If it is true that gay men and IV-drug users are the populations at risk for this disease, then we have a right to demand that education and prevention be targeted specifically to these people. And it is not happening. We are being allowed to die, while low-risk populations are being panicked — not educated, panicked — into believing that we deserve to die. 

Why are we here together today? We’re here because it is happening to us, and we do give a shit. And if there were more of us and less of them, AIDS wouldn’t be what it is at this moment in history. It’s more than just a disease, which ignorant people have turned into an excuse to exercise the bigotry they have always felt. It is more than a horror story, exploited by the tabloids. AIDS is really a test of us as a people. When future generations ask what we did in this crisis, we’re going to have to tell them that we were out here today. And we have to leave the legacy to those generations of people who will come after us. 

Someday, the AIDS crisis will be over. Remember that. And when that day comes, when that day has come and gone, there’ll be people alive on this Earth, gay people and straight people, men and women, black and white, who will hear the story that once there was a terrible disease in this country and all over the world, and that a brave group of people stood up and fought and, in some cases, gave their lives, so that other people might live and be free. So I’m proud to be with my friends today and the people I love, because I think you’re all heroes, and I’m glad to be part of this fight. But, to borrow a phrase from Michael Callen’s song, “all we have is love right now. What we don’t have is time.” 

In a lot of ways, AIDS activists are like those doctors out there: They’re so busy putting out fires and taking care of people on respirators that they don’t have the time to take care of all the sick people. We’re so busy putting out fires right now that we don’t have the time to talk to each other and strategize and plan for the next wave, and the next day, and next month, and the next week, and the next year. And we’re going to have to find the time to do that in the next few months. And we have to commit ourselves to doing that. And then, after we kick the shit out of this disease, we’re all going to be alive to kick the shit out of this system, so that this never happens again.

(via repetition-is-holy)

December 2, 2013
this-alien:

Thousands Of HIV/AIDS Activism Posters Are Now Viewable Online
— via joe.my.god.

this-alien:

Thousands Of HIV/AIDS Activism Posters Are Now Viewable Online

— via joe.my.god.

(via thatbirdonlysingswhensad)

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